Thursday, 12 January 2012

Making an hourglass quilt...

I will confess that I set out to make a pinwheel quilt... However, after the first block, having not bothered to check a pattern, I discovered it was going to be an hourglass quilt after all! It's not a problem, sewing this week is more about de-stressing myself than trying to create a perfect item. 

I had a charm pack left over from my shopping in America, Charlevoix by Moda. It was such good value that, although normally I hate to waste any fabric, I felt happy to experiment with this one. For anyone not familiar with charm packs, they are packs of pre-cut 5 inch squares, normally there are 42 squares in a pack representing all or most of a particular fabric range. It's a great way to make a small quilt using lots of different fabrics, which you know will all coordinate.


 

Luckily I had lots of plain blue fabric left from making It's A Hoot recently. I cut this up into 5 inch squares too. The design is so simple, and would be a good one for someone making their first quilt.

The next step is to lie a patterned piece face down on a plain piece.

  

Turn it over, and mark a line from corner to corner, using a chalk stick.

Using a quarter inch foot,  sew a line a quarter of an inch to either side of the marked line...


 You should then have something like this...


Using a rotary cutter and ruler, cut down the original chalk line.


This will then give you two squares, each made of two triangles. Press them open with an iron. With all your triangles at this stage, iron them open towards the plain fabric. This will help the seams to match up in the next stage.


Now comes the only remotely tricky part... Place the two triangles on top of each other, with wrong sides facing, and with pattern facing plain. Fiddle around to make sure the seams are tightly together.


Draw a line from corner to corner, and then sew carefully a quarter of an inch to either side. As before, then cut along the original chalk line.


Open each side out, and iron carefully. Hopefully you will have something that looks like this...


A charm pack will yield 84 of these, if combined with a plain fabric. Next step, arranging them all to make the quilt.


1 comment:

  1. That is really very clever - even if the maths were beyond me! All the projects I've seen on your blog are lovely. Well done Dx

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